Clinton

Reflecting over McAuliffe’s conflicts of interests

For a man of such education and reputation, it is interesting to note that McAuliffe does have a lot of conflict of interest when it comes to his political and

business life. In fact, if one does look just close enough, it appears both go hand-in-hand and one couldn’t exist without the other.

One of McAuliffe’s initial forays into conflicts of interests comes from Federal City National Bank, a bank he helped to co-found in 1985. By 1988, the bank’s board elected McAuliffe as chairman, making him the youngest chairman in the United States Federal Reserve Bank’s charter association. The bank later merged with Credit International Bank, and he became Vice-Chairman there.

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The Mechanics of Deception

Much has been said and written about Christopher Steele’s authorship of the notorious document that alleges Russia-Trump collusion. According to Glenn Simpson of Fusion GPS (who plead the Fifth and only spoke through his lawyers), Steele was hired by them in June 2016 to gather information about “links between Russia and [then-presidential candidate] Donald Trump.” Pursuant to that business arrangement, Steele prepared a series of reports styled as intelligence briefings, some of which were later compiled into a collection of documents and published by a number of media outlets and later become known as the “Trump dossier.”

Marina Abramovic: the sponsors and the funding

Marina Abramamovic is certainly an interesting character full of controversy. One of such controversies revolves around her ‘Marina Abramovic Institute’. Apparently Marina, or her team, were posting volunteer jobs on the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA). While the work offered was part-time and unpaid, the abilities required to fill each position demands a certain level of qualifications and computer skills beyond what should be expected for any type of unpaid work. Some of the positions offered were:v

A simple explanation of U.S corruption

Last week saw the release of the applications used to obtain warrants from the FISA court to spy on Carter Page, an adviser to the Trump presidential campaign. Obtained by Judicial Watch, the 400-plus pages of (heavily redacted) documents support the conclusions earlier drawn by the House Intelligence Committee (and denounced by Democrats as hysteria): the FISA warrants were obtained through obfuscation and deceit.